functional nutrition
Take the guesswork out of your nutrition
Take the guesswork out of your nutrition
Test Descriptions


functional nutrition regularly employs the test procedures which are briefly described below.  They are either carried out in our offices or outsourced to commercial laboratories.  In either case, we try our utmost to minimise costs for our clients.  functional nutrition passes all tests on to patients at cost, so there are no financial incentives whatsoever to carry out any of these diagnostic procedures.  In fact, some of them are offered for free to clients.

Please note that none of these procedures is designed to or capable of making any sort of diagnosis, nor are they meant to cure, treat or prevent disease!




A. BLOOD TESTS
(please note that only one finger prick is required to do several assessments)

  1. Fasting Glucose:
    (in-office procedure – FREE)
    Blood sugar, or glucose, is the primary energy source for body cells and is normally tightly regulated.  The body’s failure to maintain blood glucose levels is an extremely important finding as it is associated with a wide range of conditions.  Capillary blood is drawn by pricking a finger in the morning prior to the ingestion of any food.
        
    Handheld glucometers are prone to underestimating true blood sugar measurements, so obtaining fasting levels is critical and more informative.  Clients may be asked to test at home over a period of time and will be provided with the necessary equipment.

  1. Live Blood Microscopy:
    (in-office procedure – FREE)
    The observation of live blood under a microscope is not a diagnostic tool since it is not quantifiable, reproducible and very prone to subjective interpretation.  However, interesting clues about a client’s health can be gathered in this manner, and the microscope can inform about the necessity for more scientific investigations.
        
    Blood is drawn by pricking a finger.  Many clients find the observation of their own live blood on a screen highly educational in terms of directly experiencing the impact that nutrition has on their physiology.  Also, the compliance with nutritional programs tends to improve.

  1. Dry-layer Microscopy:
    (in-office procedure – FREE)
    The observation of coagulated blood under a microscope is not a diagnostic tool since it is not quantifiable, reproducible and very prone to subjective interpretation.  However, interesting clues about a client’s health can be gathered in this manner, and the microscope can inform about the necessity for more scientific investigations.
        
    Blood is drawn by pricking a finger and then left to dry.  Many clients find the observation of their blood on a screen highly educational in terms of directly seeing the impact that nutrition has on their physiology.  Also, the compliance with nutritional programs tends to improve.

  1. Cholesterol:
    (in-office procedure – P.O.A.)
    Cholesterol is a lipid produced mostly by the liver and present in every cell.  It is also an important precursor for all steroid hormones.  Historically, cholesterol has been viewed as a marker for cardiovascular health, but it role in this might have been overstated and it is now being replaced by more accurate predictors.  However, serum cholesterol levels are still important indicators for hepatic, digestive and cardiovascular wellbeing.

    Blood is drawn by pricking a finger and then analysed by an FDA-approved testing device.  Results for total cholesterol, LDL, HDL as well as triglycerides are available within 5 to 10 minutes.

  1. High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP):
    (in-office procedure – P.O.A.)
    hs-CRP is a non-specific but sensitive blood marker for inflammatory processes in the body.  It has become an invaluable tool in the identification and evaluation of systemic inflammation.

    FDA-approved testing device.  Results for hs-CRP are available within 5 to 10 minutes.

  1. Liver Enzymes (AST/SGOT and ALT/SGPT):
    (in-office procedure – P.O.A.)
    These two key enzymes are extremely useful in assessing and monitoring liver function and overall hepatic health.  While not meant to be diagnostic, following the development of these two markers can allow insights whether targeted nutritional programs are effective.

    Blood is drawn by pricking a finger and then analysed by an FDA-approved testing device.  Results for AST/SGOT and ALT/SGPT are available within 5 to 10 minutes.

  1. Helicobacter pylori

  2. Celiac Disease (IgA antibodies)

  3. Food Sensitivities/Allergies (IgG antibodies)

  4. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

  5. Blood Chemistry and Blood Count Interpretation


B. URINE TESTS

  1. Urinary pH:
    (description to follow shortly)

  2. Urine Glucose:
    (description to follow shortly)

  3. Conductivity/Resistivity:
    (description to follow shortly)

  4. Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP/rH2):
    (description to follow shortly)

  5. Total Dissolved Units:
    (description to follow shortly)

  6. Surface Tension:
    (description to follow shortly)

  7. Specific Gravity:
    (description to follow shortly)

  8. Refractometry (BRIX):
    (description to follow shortly)

  9. Urine Sediment:
    (description to follow shortly)

  10. Obermeyer’s (or Urine Incidan) Test:
    (description to follow shortly)

  11. Sulkowitch (or Calcium Excretion) Test:
    (description to follow shortly)

  12. Vitamin C exretion:
    (description to follow shortly)

  13. Free Radical Test:
    (description to follow shortly)

C. SALIVA TESTS

  1. Salivary pH

  2. pH Acid Challenge

  3. Conductivity/Resistivity

  4. Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP/rH2)

  5. Refractometry (BRIX)

D. OTHER TESTS

  1. Body Weight and Body Composition

  2. Blood Pressure

  3. Resting Pulse

  4. Breath Rate and Breath Hold

  5. Ragland’s (or Postural Hypotension) test

  6. Paradoxical Pupillary Response

  7. Ultrasound Bone Densitometry

  8. Neuro-lingual Taste Testing

  9. Comprehensive Stool Analysis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 






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